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By On June 23, 2018

VAT fraud: EU approves cooperation agreement with Norway

  • 22/06/2018
  • 11:15
  • Press release
  • 379/18
  • Economy & finance

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On 22 June 2018, the Council approved an agreement with Norway aimed at boosting cooperation in the area of VAT.

The agreement, < strong>signed in Sofia on 6 February 2018, provides EU member states and Norway with a legal framework for administrative cooperation in:

  • preventing VAT fraud;
  • assisting each other in the recovery of VAT claims.

The agreement follows the same structure that is currently used for cooperation between the EU's member states. It provides for the same instruments, such as electronic platforms and e-forms. Fraud schemes often exploit weaknesses in the way VAT transaction chains are controlled when they include counterparts located in third countries.

Norway is the first country with which the EU has an agreement in this field. A member of the European Economic Area, it has a similar VAT system to the EU's and enjoys a good track record of VAT cooperation with the EU member states.

The decision to approve the agreement was taken without discussion at a meet ing of the Economic and Financial Affairs Council.

Visit the meeting page Download as pdfSource: Google News Norway | Netizen 24 Norway

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By On June 23, 2018

Norway OSEAX - Is The Growth Sustainable?

Summary

Norway's OSEAX index has seen significant growth in price terms.

However, this has not been accompanied by GDP growth and appears to be due to rising oil prices.

However, oil prices themselves have risen by a larger margin than the OSEAX.

In my view, the growth we are seeing in the OSEAX index is unsustainable.

Source: Google News Norway | Netizen 24 Norway

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By On June 23, 2018

New national park will protect 'unique' part of Norway: minister

The Lofotodden National Park is located in Nordland county on the outer edges of the Lofoten region.

“This is one of the most unique things in Norway. The area has very clear national and international preservation qualities,” climate and environment minister Ola Elvestuen told NRK.

“The new national park has landscape and nature types that do not exist in any of Norway’s other natural areas. We have now ensured that future generations will be able to enjoy the characteristic and unique landscape with its narrow, high peaks surround by open seas and deep fjords,” he said.

The area is rich in mountain flora and was one of the first regions to become uncovered at the end of the last Ice Age, meaning that some of the oldest types of mountain vegetation can be found there, NRK writes.

“The area we have now protected also has extremely hi gh cultural-historical value with traces of settlement going back to the Stone Age. Cave paintings at Kollhellaren and Bukkhammerhola hace been there since Stone Age people painted them on the walls around 3,000 years ago. That says a lot about how important this area was going back a long way,” Elvestuen said.

Although local politicians were in favour of the national park, it also saw considerable opposition, with a majority in local municipality Moskenes voting against it in 2015. Opponents cited the effect of implementing a national park on the local fishing industry, amongst other concerns.

But Elvestuen said that creating a national park in the area would not place any new restrictions on residents.

“There will not be more limitations on transport than are necessary to comply with regulations on preservation and the aim of preservation. That does not require any changes from today, but we are ensuring that Lofotodden will be protected. A nat ional park protection will also bring national funds for administration and maintenance of the national park,” he said to NRK.

Both Moskenes and Flakstad, the two municipalities in which the national park is located, are traditional fishing communities. Although some marine areas are included in the national park, these are not areas suitable for fishing, Elvestuen said.

The limits of the national park were designed so that most recreational buildings as well as a potential water source and the location of possible energy production facilities are placed outside it, he said.

READ ALSO: Braving Norway's cold: Surfing above the Arctic Circle

Source: Google News Norway | Netizen 24 Norway

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By On June 21, 2018

Norway board approves $6900 proposal for Municipal Building renovations

NORWAY â€" The Board of Selectmen voted unanimously Thursday night to accept a $6,900 proposal for architectural services for the Municipal Building at 19 Danforth St.

Kennebunk River Architects submitted a $8,625 proposal, Norway architect Richard McSherry submitted at $6,900 proposal and Joy & Hamilton of Auburn submitted a $6,500 proposal.

Town Manager Dennis Lajoie said $20,000 in a reserve account that was approved at a previous town meeting for renovations to the Police Department building space, and that the floor plans would be paid for out of that account.

He explained to the board that the proposal would pay for schematic designs for a large section of the municipal building, including the space housing the Norway Police Department.

“The idea would be to take the space where the current community room is and make that into the police station ,” Lajoie said. “We would also enlarge other parts of the municipal building.”

Selectman Russell Newcomb said that he liked the idea of keeping the work local and said that the difference between McSherry’s proposal and Joy & Hamilton was “minimal.”

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Selectman Mike Twitchell agreed, adding that he thought McSherry was “a sharp guy” and recommended the board approve his proposal.

The board also voted unanimously to re-approve an alcohol license for Cafe Nomad.

mdaigle@sunmediagroup.net

Norway Selectman Russell Newcomb, left, and Chairman Warren Sessions Jr. review a list of proposals for architectual services to the Municipal Building during Thursday evening’s board meeting. (Matthew Daigle/Sun Journal)

Source: Google News Norway | Netizen 24 Norway

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By On June 21, 2018

Human rights court rejects Norway mass killer's appeal

COPENHAGEN, Denmark â€" The European Court of Human Rights rejected an appeal Thursday by Norwegian mass murderer Anders Behring Breivik, who claimed his incarceration violated his rights.

The Strasbourg, France-based court said Breivik, who is serving a 21-year sentence for killing 77 people in in 2011, challenged the conditions of his detention, particularly being kept isolated from other prisoners.

But it found his confinement "doesn't reveal any violations" of the 1950 European Convention on Human Rights and therefore "rejected the application as inadmissible for being manifestly ill-founded."

The three judges who considered the case said the decision was final.

Breivik is held in a three-cell complex in Norway where he can play video games, watch TV and exercise. He has complained about the quality of the prison food, having to eat with plastic utensils and not being able to communicate with sympathizers.

Breivik, who has l egally changed his name to Fjotolf Hansen, also claimed that being subjected to frequent strip searches and the time he spent often handcuffed early in his prison term violated his rights.

Last year, Norway's top court ruled that Norwegian authorities had not violated his human rights by isolating him in prison.

Breivik's lawyer, Oeystein Storrvik, told Norwegian news agency NTB the ruling was "thorough" and there are currently no plans to contest the terms of Breivik's imprisonment through another legal challenge.

"There is a limit for how long such incarceration can continue without a person suffering from it,&qu ot; Storrvik said. "The impression I have gotten from recent conversations with my client is that the isolation is getting worse and worse."

Breivik meticulously planned the bomb-and-shooting attacks that claimed 77 lives on July 22, 2011. He first set off a car bomb outside the government headquarters in Oslo, killing eight people and wounding dozens.

He then drove to the island of Utoya, 40 kilometers (25 miles) away, where he opened fire at a summer camp of the left-wing Labor Party's youth wing. Sixty-nine people were killed, most of them teenagers, before Breivik surrendered to police.

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Source: Google News Norway | Netizen 24 Norway