thumbnail

By On August 16, 2018

US to more than double the number of Marines in Norway, strengthening defenses along the border with Russia

US Marines in Norway.JPG
Marines with Combined Arms Company, step back as an M777 Howitzer fires a round during a live-fire shoot in Rena, Norway
US Marine Corps

  • The US is expected to more than double the number of US Marines in Norway, the Norwegian defense ministry revealed Wednesday.
  • The number of US Marines in country is expected to increase from a little over 300 to 700. Some of the deployed Marines will be sent to the border with Russia.
  • Moscow has protested the plan, characterizing it "clearly unfriendly."

OSLO (Reuters) - The United States will more than double the number of Marines stationed in Norway, in line with plans first outlined in June, the Norwegian defense ministry said on Wednesday.

Plans to increase the number of Marines in Norway to 700 from 330 and moving some of them closer to the border with Russia had triggered a sharp reaction from Moscow, which called the plans "clearly unfriendly".

The government in Oslo, increasingly concerned about Russia since the annexation of Crimea in 2014, insists the increased U.S. presence is only for training purposes and should not be interpreted as a military escalation.

The Marines had been scheduled to leave Norway at the end of this year after an initial contingent arrived in 2017 to train for fighting in winter conditions. They are the first foreign troops stationed in Norway since World War Two.

Foreign Minister Ine Eriksen Soereide has previously told reporters the decision did not constitute establishing a permanent U.S. base in Norway and did not target Russia.

The rotation of forces will last for up to five years compared with an initial posting that ran for six months from the start of 2017, and then was extended last June.

(Reporting by Terje Solsvik, edited by Larry King)

Source: Google News Norway | Netizen 24 Norway

thumbnail

By On August 16, 2018

Norway Keeps Rates Unchanged on Path to Tightening Next Month

Terms of Service Violation

Your usage has been flagged as a violation of our terms of service.

For inquiries related to this message please contact support. For sales inquiries, please visit http://www.bloomberg.com/professional/request-demo

If you believe this to be in error, please confirm below that you are not a robot by clicking "I'm not a robot" below.


Please make sure your browser supports JavaScript and cookies and that you are not blocking them from loading. For more information you can review the Terms of Service and Cookie Policy.


Block reference ID:

Source: Google News Norway | Netizen 24 Norway

thumbnail

By On August 16, 2018

Norway Holds, Turkey in Spotlight, UK Retail Sales: Eco Day

Terms of Service Violation

Your usage has been flagged as a violation of our terms of service.

For inquiries related to this message please contact support. For sales inquiries, please visit http://www.bloomberg.com/professional/request-demo

If you believe this to be in error, please confirm below that you are not a robot by clicking "I'm not a robot" below.


Please make sure your browser supports JavaScript and cookies and that you are not blocking them from loading. For more information you can review the Terms of Service and Cookie Policy.


Block reference ID:

Source: Google News Norway | Netizen 24 Norway

no image

By On August 15, 2018

Emissions from energy-rich Norway on the decline

Aug. 15 (UPI) -- The Norwegian government reported Wednesday that total greenhouse gas emissions were lower, with declines in pollution from road traffic leading the way.

Statistics Norway, the government's record-keeping agency, published data showing total greenhouse gas emissions declined in 2017 by 1.7 percent from the previous year. By sector, manufacturing and mining had the greatest increase with 4.3 percent from 2016, while emissions from road transportation had the greatest decrease with 9.6 percent.

There were 142,490 total electric cars registered in the country at the beginning of the year, up more than 40 percent from one year ago. Passenger vehicles made up 97 percent of that total.

The Norwegian government said electric vehicles make up about 5 percent of the passenger fleet, compared with 3.7 percent at the end of 2016. Tax exemptions, extended range and more acces s to charging stations are in part behind the trend.

RELATED EV progress influenced by cobalt and lithium prices

British energy company BP reported in an annual forecast that it expected 180 million electric vehicles on the world's roads by 2035. That could crimp global oil demand in the coming years as about 30 percent of total miles driven in 2040 will be fueled by electricity.

Norway derives much of its own power from renewable resources, sending nearly all of its offshore oil and natural gas production to the European market. Emissions from energy supply in the country are down more than 300 percent from their 1990 benchmark levels.

Emissions from the oil and gas sector were down 1.4 percent from 2016 and 78 percent lower than the level in 1990. The Norwegian Petroleum Directorate, the nation's energy regulator, reported total production for oil in June, the last full month for which data are available, averaged 1.48 million barrels per day, about 3 percent lower than forecast and the second month in a row for a decline.

RELATED BP gets praise for smart bet on EV RELATED Faster EV chargers to allay range anxietySource: Google News Norway | Netizen 24 Norway