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By On November 07, 2018

Norway Manufacturing Output Unexpectedly Drops In September

S & P 500 26.61 2,782.06 (0.97%) Pre-market 06:43:27 AM EST NASDAQ 100 96.57 7,085.42 (1.38%) Pre-market 06:47:49 AM EST DJIA 200.90 25,841.90 (0.78%) Pre-market 06:47:49 AM EST NIKKEI 225 -2.40 22,287.60 (-0.01%) 06:45:38 AM EST Norway Manufacturing Output Unexpectedly Drops In September RTTNews Nov. 7, 2018, 06:43 AM

(RTTNews) - Norway's manufacturing output decreased in September, defying expectations for a gain, mainly due to a decline in the production of food, figures from Statistics Norway showed on Wednesday.

Manufacturing output fell 0.3 percent from August. Economists were looking for a 0.4 percent increase.

Product ion of food, beverages and tobacco registered a 4.2 percent fall.

In contrast, manufacture of ships, boats and oil platforms increased 4.3 percent.

Overall industrial production decreased 1.5 percent monthly in September.

On a year-on-year basis, manufacturing output grew 1.5 percent and industrial production rose 0.7 percent.

In the third quarter, manufacturing output rose 0.6 percent from the previous three months and industrial production increased 1.4 percent.

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By On November 07, 2018

Norway wealth fund should not add new equity markets to index amid review - ministry

OSLO (Reuters) - Norway's sovereign wealth fund should not add new markets to its benchmark equity index until a review of its composition has been concluded, the finance ministry said in a letter to the central bank, which manages the fund.

The fund, which invests proceeds of Norway's oil and gas industry in foreign stocks, bonds and properties, has the power to deviate from its benchmark, but tends to increase investments in countries and regions once they are included in the index.

Tuesday's letter from the ministry gave the central bank until June 2019 to evaluate how its current benchmark affects geographical distribution of investments, emerging market risks and other issues.

While the review lasts, the $995-billion fund should assign a zero index weight to any new markets included in the FTSE Global All-Cap Index from Jan. 1, 2019, the ministry said.

It was not immediately clear how the review would affect investments.

On Oct. 26, the fund said it planned to more than double its investments in Saudi Arabia after the Middle Eastern country's inclusion in the index, expected in 2019.

(Reporting by Terje Solsvik; Editing by Camilla Knudsen and Clarence Fernandez)

Source: Google News Norway | Netizen 24 Norway

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By On November 07, 2018

Norway wealth fund should not add new equity markets to index amid review

Reuters

OSLO, Nov 7 (Reuters) - Norway's sovereign wealth fund should not add new markets to its benchmark equity index until a review of its composition has been concluded, the finance ministry said in a letter to the central bank, which manages the fund.

The fund, which invests proceeds of Norway's oil and gas industry in foreign stocks, bonds and properties, has the power to deviate from its benchmark, but tends to increase investments in countries and regions once they are included in the index.

Tuesday's letter from the ministry gave the central bank until June 2019 to evaluate how its current benchmark affects geographical distribution of investm ents, emerging market risks and other issues.

It was not immediately clear how the review would affect investments.

On Oct. 26, the fund said it planned to more than double its investments in Saudi Arabia after the Middle Eastern country's inclusion in the index, expected in 2019.


This article appears in: Stocks , 401k , Banking and Loans , RetirementSource: Google News Norway | Netizen 24 Norway

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By On November 06, 2018

Is It Illegal to Die in Longyearbyen, Norway?

Located on the archipelago of Svalbard just 800 miles from the North Pole, the Norwegian village of Longyearbyen is reputed to be the world’s most northerly town. Deep within the Arctic Circle, the old coal-mining hub doesn’t see sunlight for about four months out of the year and is riddled with polar bearsâ€"and yet it’s home to approximately 2000 residents and sees upwards of 65,000 visitors each year.

According to the BBC, The Guardian, WIRED, Bustle, Men’s Health, The Sun, New York Post, IFL Science, Stuff, Ripley’s Believe it or Not, and a handful of other publications, a quirky law in Longyearbyen makes it illegal for any of those people to die. This colorful factoid is apparently even parroted by tour guides who live in the region.

But it’s not true.

There is no law in Longyearbyen making it illegal to die. “It is not forbid den to die in Longyearbyen,” Jovna Z. Dunfjell of the Svalbard Church tells Mental Floss in an email. “If that had been the case, how would you punish the act?”

The myth of a “forbidden to die” law appears to have emerged from the town’s unusual geography. Since Longyearbyen is so far off the beaten path, there are no elder care homes. The town has a small local hospital, but it’s not equipped to handle most serious medical cases.

“It is not forbidden to die in Longyearbyen ...” Svalbard’s Information Adviser Liv Asta Ødegaard wrote in an email to the editors of Wikipedia (yep, even Wikipedia was skeptical of this story). “All inhabitants in Longyearbyen have to keep an address on the main land, and when they get old and need help and nursing from the society, they have to move back to the main land.”

In other words, dying isn’t bannedâ€"it’s just uncommon. If you’re in danger of dying, the local hospital will send you to a souther n hospital. (Though it’s obviously not something people can always prepare for: In 2015, an avalanche there killed two people.)

However, for Longyearbyen's unlucky dead, it is forbidden to be buried in a coffin. It’s so chilly in Longyearbyen that bodies barely decompose. (Urns are allowed, however.)

In fact, some century-old bodies in the local cemetery still contain rare remnants of the 1918 influenza virus that killed around 40 million people. In 1998, researchers visited the graveyard to gather samples of the virus’s genetic material. The findings were extremely valuable and have helped scientists better understand how to combat similar cases in the future. The research could save millions of lives.

(And if you're planning a trip, don't believe the rumors that this virus could spread to visitors. In an email, Svalbard’s Communication Adviser Terje Carlsen writes: “This is not an active virus and is not considered a threat.” Watch o ut for those polar bears, though!)

Subscribe to our Newsletter! SIGN UP NOWSource: Google News Norway | Netizen 24 Norway

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By On November 06, 2018

Norway uses Exercise Trident Juncture to strengthen its national resilience

  1. Norway uses Exercise Trident Juncture to strengthen its national resilience NATO HQ (press release)
  2. NATO Troops Bruise, Arrest Autistic Man During Massive Drills in Norway Sputnik International
  3. Marines create their own bridge in Norway We Are The Mighty (blog)
  4. Full coverage
Source: Google News Norway | Netizen 24 Norway

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By On November 06, 2018

Family promotion in Norway

Family promotion in Norway Family Promotion in Norway

Photo By Lance Cpl. Camila Melendez | U.S. Marine Corps Master Sgt. Thanh Nguyen with 2nd Marine Logistics Group, II Marine...... read more read more

Photo By Lance Cpl. Camila Melendez | U.S. Marine Corps Master Sgt. Thanh Nguyen with 2nd Marine Logistics Group, II Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF), congratulates his son, Cpl. Anthony Nguyen with 8th Communications Battalion, II MEF Information Group, on Vaernes Air Station, Norway, Nov. 2, 2018. Exer cise Trident Juncture 18 enhances the U.S. and NATO Allies’ and partners’ abilities to work together collectively to conduct military operations under challenging conditions. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Camila Melendez) see less | View Image Page

VAERNES AIR STATION, NORWAY

11.02.2018

Story by Lance Cpl. Camila Melendez

II MEF Information Group

âœ" ✗ Subscribe 7

VAERNES, Norway â€" Exercise Trident Juncture 18, a NATO-led exercise taking place here, includes more than 50,000 participants from 31 Allied and partner nations.
Two of those participants are a father and son from Dodge City, Kansas, who have both taken a path to service in the Corps.
U.S. Marine Corps Master Sgt. Thanh Nguyen was born in Vietnam and lived in a refugee camp in Thailand for six years, until his process to migrate to the U.S. was completed at the age of eight.
“I came to the states in the late 80’s,” says Master Sgt. Nguyen. “My parents were immigrants from Vietnam and they were already in the U.S., so during that process, when I left Vietnam I was a toddler.”
When he was 18, he got a phone call from a Marine Corps recruiter and left for boot camp soon after, leaving behind his unborn son, who would later be taking the same journey.
Anthony N guyen was born into the military culture, watching his father grow and succeed.
Now, having a father with twenty-one years of experience in the Marine Corps, Cpl. Nguyen says that without his father’s guidance, he would not be the Marine he is today.
“I’m really blessed to have him as my dad,” says Cpl. Anthony Nguyen. ”I’m grateful to him for the Marine Corps, because he has supported me the entirety of my life.”
Cpl. Nguyen was promoted to the rank of corporal during Exercise Trident Juncture 18 and had the privilege of having his father present during the ceremony.
“I’m honored and privileged,” said Master Sgt. Nguyen. “It’s very unique that we are able to serve at the same time and participate in a major exercise like this.”
As the promotion warrant was read, Master Sgt. Nguyen stood behind his son waiting to pin him with his new rank.
“I’m proud of him, he definitely deserved the promotion,” said Master Sgt. Nguyen. “I congratulated him, I told him he has a lot on his shoulders now, and that he needs to lead by example.”
Now, as a new noncommissioned officer, Cpl. Nguyen can keep in mind all of the knowledge he has gained from his experienced father.

Date Taken: 11.02.2018
Date Posted: 11.06.2018 07:49
Story ID: 298914
Location: VAERNES AIR STATION, NO
Hometown: DODGE CIT Y, KS, US
Web Views: 15
Downloads: 0
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    By On November 06, 2018

    Russia expects explanations, apologies from Norway concerning Bochkarev incident

    MOSCOW, November 6. /TASS/. Moscow expects explanations and apologies from Oslo concerning an incident with Russian Federation Council (upper house of parliament) employee Mikhail Bochkarev, who was charged with espionage in Norway, the Russian embassy in Oslo said in a statement on Tuesday.

    "Russia cannot consider the Mikhail Bochkarev incident closed. We cannot pretend that nothing happened and it is a matter only for law enforcement agencies to tackle," the statement reads. "The masterminds and perpetrators of this provocation must be held accountable. Russia expects serious explanations and apologies from Norway," the embassy added.

    Read also Russian Foreign Ministry Spokeswoman Maria Zakharova

    Bochkarev incident to affect parliamentary ties between Russia, Norway, Moscow says

    "It is no ordinary offense. Another blow has been delivered to bilateral relations. Russian representatives have been facing more and more issues while in Norway, and dialogue is becoming more and more difficult," the statement says.

    According to the embassy, the Bochkarev incident was a result of the anti-Russian atmosphere created by Norwegian authorities. "What happened in Norway is a result of the authorities’ condoning of a paranoid spy mania, fostered by the country’s intelligence agencies, and a toxic atmosphere created by anti-Russian statements regularly made by the Norwegian establishment, including the Storting [Norway’s parliament]," the embassy noted.

    Media’s responsibility

    "An expert was invited to the Storting, a stronghold of democracy in Norway, which should be an example of openness, and was arrested only for being on the parliament premises. Is it a new form of Norwegian hospitality to invite people and then provoke their arrest?" Russian diplomats said.

    According to the embassy, the country’s media have a special responsibility. "For a whole month, they savored the details of the incident, published unverified information and leaks, invented horror stories about the Russian state spying on Norwegians even in their own parliament building and threw dirt at our country, forgetting their main task, which is to provide the public with objective information. After this anti-Russian trick failed, they all became silent as if on cue," the Russian embassy stressed.

    Bochkarev incident

    Bochkarev was detained at Oslo Gardermoen Airport on September 21 on espionage charges. Acco rding to Norway, he was collecting data during a European Center for Parliamentary Research and Documentation seminar, held in the Storting’s building, using the local Wi-Fi network. However, Bochkarev was released from custody on October 19 and returned to his home country.

    The Federation Council employee slammed his arrest as absurd, while his lawyer said that a countersuit against Norwegian authorities would be filed.

    Following Bochkarev’s arrest, Russian senators decided to refrain from visiting Norway in the near future.

    {{item.group_date}} {{item.suffix?", "+item.suffix:""}} Show moreSource: Google News Norway | Netizen 24 Norway